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News & Views From Brighton

Six years on, Lammy has had an image makeover, dispensing with his spectacles and wearing sharper suits, and has secured backing from City businessmen , including the first chair of the Boris Johnson-founded Mayors Fund for London charity. Hes also been positioning himself distinctively on social issues, proceeding from the argument expounded in Out of the Ashes , the book he wrote about the 2011 London riots, which, of course, began in his back yard. In his Introduction he explained: The backdrop to these riots was two revolutions with which Britain has yet to come to terms. The first was social and cultural; the social liberalism of the 1960s. The second was economic: the free market liberal revolution of the 1980s. Together, they made Britain a wealthier and more tolerant nation. But they have come at a cost, combining to create a hyper-individualistic culture in which we do not treat each other well. He continued: A civilised and safe society must be policed not just by uniformed officers, but also by notions of pride, shame, self-restraint and responsibility to others. This diagnosis appears at first sight very similar to that of the Daily Mail columnist Melanie Phillips of the nations ills, though Im assured that Lammy doesnt mean to criticise either form of liberalism as such, only what he sees as their regrettable consequences for social solidarity.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/davehillblog/2015/may/04/david-lammy-the-tottenham-factor-and-the-london-mayoralty

His role, according to Mike Freer, the incumbent for Finchley and Golders Green who is threatened by Labours Sarah Sackman, is to add glitter and star quality. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Johnson tries to persuade a UKIP supporter to vote Conservative. Photograph: Teri Pengilley for the Guardian Another MP, speaking off the record, admitted: Boris is now a preference to anyone else that Conservative central office could send to help, including the prime minister. He is proving adept attracting the blue-collar voters London Conservatives need to to save their seats, some said. Nick de Bois, the Tory defending the Enfield North constituency, who has also hosted the mayor, said: Black, white and minority ethnic groups in particular are switched on by Boris. Lee Scott, the candidate for Ilford North, said: It was like going out with a pop star. He is mobbed wherever he goes. He must have done 250 selfies when he was here with me. A bus driver even stopped his bus in the street to get a selfie with him. Mary Macleod, fighting to save her Brentford and Isleworth seat, said Johnsons engaging street politics warmed up voters who she might otherwise not reach, vital in tight battles like hers where she is trying to transcend party politics. Related: Boris Johnson rolls up for brief cameo in Tory election campaign and steals the show In the Forestdale suburb of Croydon on Tuesday night, Johnson went door to door trying to persuade Ukip supporters to return to the Tories.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/06/boris-johnson-guardian-readers-vote-tory-general-election-conservatives

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